14 days in Normandy & Brittany Itinerary

14 days in Normandy & Brittany Itinerary

Created using Inspirock France vacation planner

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Make it your trip
Drive
1
Bayeux
— 3 nights
Drive
2
Carantec
— 2 nights
Drive
3
Perros-Guirec
— 3 nights
Drive
4
Saint-Malo
— 4 nights
Drive
5
Etretat
— 1 night
Drive

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Bayeux

— 3 nights
Most travelers take a trip to Bayeux to see the famed tapestry depicting the legendary Norman Conquest from the 11th century.
We've included these beaches for you: Plage de Trouville and Deauville Beach. Step off the beaten path and head to Remains Mulberry Harbour and D-Day Experience (Dead Man's Corner museum). Change things up with these side-trips from Bayeux: La Batterie d'Azeville (Azeville gun battery) (in Azeville), Pegasus Memorial (in Ranville) and Ouistreham Beach (in Ouistreham). Next up on the itinerary: stroll the grounds of Normandy American Cemetery, get engrossed in the history at Juno Beach Centre, admire the masterpieces at Musee de la Tapisserie de Bayeux, and brush up on your knowledge of spirits at Calvados Pere Magloire L'Experience.

For where to stay, ratings, photos, and other tourist information, refer to the Bayeux sightseeing planner.

Brussels, Belgium to Bayeux is an approximately 5-hour car ride. You can also take a train; or do a combination of flight and train. Expect a daytime high around 27°C in July, and nighttime lows around 15°C. Finish your sightseeing early on the 28th (Wed) to allow enough time to drive to Carantec.

Things to do in Bayeux

Museums · Historic Sites · Outdoors · Parks

Side Trips

Find places to stay Jul 25 — 28:

Carantec

— 2 nights
Carantec is a commune in the Finistère department of Brittany in north-western France.Carantec is located on the coast of the English Channel, and contains a small island within its boundaries, Île Callot. Start off your visit on the 29th (Thu): admire the natural beauty at Jardin Exotique et Botanique de Roscoff, step off the mainland to explore Ile de Batz, and then enjoy the sand and surf at Plage de Carantec. On the 30th (Fri), you'll have a packed day of sightseeing: explore the historical opulence of Chateau du Taureau, then don't miss a visit to Enclos Paroissial de Saint-Thegonnec, and then delve into the lush surroundings at Foret de Huelgoat.

To see other places to visit, traveler tips, photos, and other tourist information, you can read our Carantec trip itinerary planning site.

Traveling by car from Bayeux to Carantec takes 3.5 hours. Alternatively, you can do a combination of train and bus. In July, plan for daily highs up to 24°C, and evening lows to 17°C. Finish up your sightseeing early on the 30th (Fri) so you can go by car to Perros-Guirec.

Things to do in Carantec

Parks · Nature · Outdoors · Historic Sites

Side Trips

Find places to stay Jul 28 — 30:

Perros-Guirec

— 3 nights

Coast of Pink Granite

Perros-Guirec is a popular seaside resort with beaches and opportunities for water and beach sports.
You'll get in some beach time at Plage de Trestraou and La Grande Plage des Rosaires. Step off the beaten path and head to Abbaye de Beauport and Ile Renote. Explore Perros-Guirec's surroundings by going to Le Phare du Paon (in Ile-de-Brehat) and Site du Gouffre (in Plougrescant). There's much more to do: tour the pleasant surroundings at Reserve Naturelle des Sept Iles, hike along Sentier des douaniers, and take in the architecture and atmosphere at Cathedrale Saint-Tugdual.

To find maps, traveler tips, more things to do, and tourist information, refer to the Perros-Guirec itinerary planner.

You can drive from Carantec to Perros-Guirec in 1.5 hours. Other options are to do a combination of bus and train; or take a bus. In July in Perros-Guirec, expect temperatures between 22°C during the day and 15°C at night. Cap off your sightseeing on the 2nd (Mon) early enough to go by car to Saint-Malo.

Things to do in Perros-Guirec

Outdoors · Parks · Historic Sites · Beaches

Side Trips

Find places to stay Jul 30 — Aug 2:

Saint-Malo

— 4 nights
Once the feared base of pirates and heavily fortified against Norman attacks, today's coastal Saint-Malo is one of the top tourist draws.
Eschew the tourist crowds and head to Cap Fréhel and Chateau de Fougeres. You'll find plenty of places to visit near Saint-Malo: Mont-Saint-Michel (Terrasse de l'Ouest & Mont Saint-Michel), Le Moulin de Moidrey (in Pontorson) and Fort La Latte (in Plevenon). The adventure continues: contemplate the long history of Fort National, get to know the fascinating history of Promenade du Clair de Lune, enjoy breathtaking views from Les Remparts de Dinan, and tour the pleasant surroundings at Plage de l'Ecluse.

To see reviews, traveler tips, photos, and more tourist information, go to the Saint-Malo trip itinerary planner.

You can drive from Perros-Guirec to Saint-Malo in 2 hours. Alternatively, you can take a train; or take a bus. Expect a daytime high around 26°C in August, and nighttime lows around 15°C. Finish up your sightseeing early on the 6th (Fri) so you can go by car to Etretat.

Things to do in Saint-Malo

Historic Sites · Outdoors · Parks · Beaches

Side Trips

Find places to stay Aug 2 — 6:

Etretat

— 1 night
Etretat is a small coastal village on the Alabaster Coast in Normandy.
Kick off your visit on the 7th (Sat): don't miss a visit to Chapelle Notre-Dame-de-la-Garde, get great views at Falaises d'Etretat, and then make a trip to Chemin des Douaniers.

To find other places to visit, maps, more things to do, and other tourist information, you can read our Etretat online journey planner.

You can drive from Saint-Malo to Etretat in 3 hours. Other options are to do a combination of train and bus; or do a combination of train and bus. In August, plan for daily highs up to 23°C, and evening lows to 17°C. Finish up your sightseeing early on the 7th (Sat) so you can go by car back home.

Things to do in Etretat

Parks · Nature
Find places to stay Aug 6 — 7:

Normandy travel guide

4.6
Monuments · Landmarks · History Museums
Discover the Alabaster Coast along the steep Normandy coast with spectacular chalk cliffs, a number of scenic villages, posh seaside holiday resorts, the Channel Islands, and the English Channel. The Channel Islands, although British Crown Dependencies, are considered culturally and historically a part of Normandy. Upper Normandy is predominantly more industrial, while Lower Normandy is predominantly agricultural. The shoreline is famed for the D-Day invasion by Allied troops on June 6, 1944, where you'll find museums and monuments with historical significance to World War II. As you explore the old towns, note the Norman architecture that follows a pattern similar to the English Romanesque architecture following the Norman Conquest of England in 1066. Typical Norman villages have many half-timbered houses in their old towns and historical vessels in their old ports. One of the most popular things to do along the Alabaster Coast is sampling its local products: The region produces hard apple ciders, Calvados apple brandies, and famous Bénédictine liqueur instead of wine due to its abundance of apple orchards.

Brittany travel guide

4.5
Landmarks · Historic Walking Areas · Specialty Museums
Known for its large number of megaliths, which simply means "big rocks," Brittany is famous for its 2,860 km (1,780 mi) of coastline and for its prehistoric menhirs (standing stones) and dolmens (stone tables)--sites that were used for burials and worship. You can see a large variety of seabirds while sightseeing along the ocean, as the region is home to colonies of cormorants, gulls, razorbills, northern gannets, common murres, and Atlantic puffins. The waters of Brittany attract marine animals, including basking sharks, grey seals, leatherback turtles, dolphins, porpoises, jellyfish, crabs, and lobsters. Brittany is widely known for the Breton horse, a local breed of draft horse, and for the Brittany gun dog. The region also has its own breeds of cattle that you can witness at area farms and open-air museums, some of which are on the brink of extinction: the Bretonne pie noir, the Froment du Léon, the Armoricann, and the Nantaise. The region has plenty of places to visit, namely a huge quantity of medieval buildings, including numerous Romanesque and Gothic churches, castles, and the iconic half-timbered houses visible in many villages, towns, and cities.