Remains Mulberry Harbour, Arromanches-les-Bains

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Historic Site · Tourist Spot
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Visit Remains Mulberry Harbour to see what's left of an engineering marvel. A Mulberry harbor was a portable, temporary harbor for rapidly offloading cargo--men, vehicles, and supplies--onto the beaches during the Allied invasion of Normandy. Designed by the British and built in England, the harbors featured breakwaters, piers, roadways, and more. Come here for an appreciation for the effort it took just to supply the troops. Use our Arromanches-les-Bains journey builder site to arrange your visit to Remains Mulberry Harbour and other attractions in Arromanches-les-Bains.
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  • Very impressive Really didn't realise the size of these structures until I saw them Well worth a visit and photo on the beach by one ashore 
    Very impressive Really didn't realise the size of these structures until I saw them Well worth a visit and photo on the beach by one ashore  more »
  • Incredible amount of history remains on this beach. What an engineering marvel to construct a floating harbor to assist in the D-Day landings. The expanse of what remains is truly incredible and a... 
    Incredible amount of history remains on this beach. What an engineering marvel to construct a floating harbor to assist in the D-Day landings. The expanse of what remains is truly incredible and a...  more »
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  • Allan Beckett was the engineer who designed the floating causeway in front of Mulberry Harbor. In June 2009, a monument was erected to him in Arromanches-les-Bains. His contribution to the Mulberry was to design the floating roads that connected the pier to the shore and an anchorage system. The road had to be strong enough to withstand the constant action of the waves, which, as occurred in the dire weather of June 1944, was much more severe than anticipated. The Beckett design, which had been tested in the harsh conditions of Scotland in winter, survived the storm that hit on June 19, 1944 and lasted for three days.

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