14 days in Western Europe Itinerary

Created using Inspirock Ireland vacation planner
Make it your trip
Fly
1
Dublin
— 4 nights
Drive
2
Donegal Town
— 1 night
Drive
3
Clifden
— 1 night
Drive
4
Galway
— 2 nights
Drive
5
Newcastle West
— 1 night
Drive
6
Cork
— 2 nights
Drive
7
Kilkenny
— 2 nights
Fly

S M T W T F S
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Dublin — 4 nights

Fair City

A history spanning over a thousand years, vibrant nightlife, and a mix of Georgian and modern architecture make Dublin a popular European tourist destination.
Dublin is known for museums, nightlife, and sightseeing. Your trip includes some of its best attractions: see the interesting displays at Kilmainham Gaol Museum, get a sense of history and politics at Dublin Castle, stroll around St Stephens Green, and sample the fine beverages at Jameson Distillery Bow St..

For reviews, ratings, other places to visit, and more tourist information, you can read our Dublin attractions planner.

New York City, USA to Dublin is an approximately 10.5-hour flight. The time zone difference moving from Eastern Standard Time to Greenwich Mean Time is 5 hours. Prepare for a bit cooler weather when traveling from New York City in May: high temperatures in Dublin hover around 59°F and lows are around 43°F. Finish your sightseeing early on the 18th (Wed) to allow enough time to drive to Donegal Town.
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Historic Sites · Museums · Parks · Neighborhoods
Find places to stay May 14 — 18:

Donegal Town — 1 night

Its rugged setting and friendly locals make Donegal a popular destination along Ireland's coast.
On the 19th (Thu), stop by Forget Me Not Craft Shop, make a trip to Lough Eske, then explore the historical opulence of Donegal Castle, and finally cruise along Bluestack Way.

To see photos, ratings, more things to do, and other tourist information, read our Donegal Town trip itinerary planning website.

You can drive from Dublin to Donegal Town in 3.5 hours. Alternatively, you can take a bus; or do a combination of flight, taxi, and bus. Traveling from Dublin in May, expect a bit warmer with lows of 51°F in Donegal Town. Cap off your sightseeing on the 19th (Thu) early enough to go by car to Clifden.
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Historic Sites · Shopping · Scenic Drive · Outdoors
Find places to stay May 18 — 19:

Clifden — 1 night

The town of Clifden represents a beloved Victorian style and is known for its position along County Galway's coast.
On the 20th (Fri), admire the natural beauty at Kylemore Abbey & Victorian Walled Garden, then enjoy the sand and surf at Dog's Bay Beach, and then catch the contagious excitement of The Point Equestrian Centre and Pony Trekking.

For where to stay, more things to do, reviews, and other tourist information, refer to the Clifden day trip planning tool.

Traveling by car from Donegal Town to Clifden takes 3 hours. Alternatively, you can take a bus; or take a bus. Finish your sightseeing early on the 20th (Fri) so you can drive to Galway.
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Parks · Fun & Games · Historic Sites · Beaches
Side Trips
Find places to stay May 19 — 20:

Galway — 2 nights

City of the Tribes

A major hub for visitors exploring Ireland's western regions, Galway serves as a city of art and culture, renowned for its vibrant lifestyle and numerous festivals.
Kick off your visit on the 21st (Sat): walk around Eyre Square, get engrossed in the history at Galway City Museum, then don't miss a visit to Quay Street, and finally make a trip to Galway's Latin Quarter. Get ready for a full day of sightseeing on the 22nd (Sun): explore the striking landscape of Connemara National Park & Visitor Centre.

For other places to visit, traveler tips, more things to do, and more tourist information, you can read our Galway trip planner.

Traveling by car from Clifden to Galway takes 2 hours. Alternatively, you can drive; or take a bus. May in Galway sees daily highs of 57°F and lows of 44°F at night. Finish your sightseeing early on the 22nd (Sun) to allow enough time to drive to Newcastle West.
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Parks · Nature · Museums
Find places to stay May 20 — 22:

Newcastle West — 1 night

Newcastle West or simply Newcastle is a town in west County Limerick, Ireland. To find other places to visit, photos, reviews, and more tourist information, refer to the Newcastle West day trip tool.

You can drive from Galway to Newcastle West in 2 hours. May in Newcastle West sees daily highs of 60°F and lows of 46°F at night. On the 23rd (Mon), you'll travel to Cork.
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Parks · Museums · Trails · Outdoors
Find places to stay May 22 — 23:

Cork — 2 nights

Rebel City

One of the country's major artistic and cultural centers, famed for its many annual festivals, Cork straddles the Lee River and boasts over 30 bridges.
Start off your visit on the 24th (Tue): step into the grandiose world of Blarney Castle & Gardens, then take an in-depth tour of Kinsale Regional Museum, then steep yourself in history at Charles Fort, and finally admire the natural beauty at Ringfinnan Garden of Remembrance. Get ready for a full day of sightseeing on the 25th (Wed): sample the fine beverages at Jameson Distillery Midleton, then contemplate in the serene atmosphere at Cobh Cathedral, then see the interesting displays at Titanic Experience Cobh, and finally pause for some photo ops at Annie Moore Statue.

To find maps, more things to do, traveler tips, and other tourist information, go to the Cork road trip planning website.

You can drive from Newcastle West to Cork in an hour. Alternatively, you can drive. Expect a daytime high around 57°F in May, and nighttime lows around 45°F. Wrap up your sightseeing on the 25th (Wed) early enough to drive to Kilkenny.
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Historic Sites · Museums · Parks · Breweries & Distilleries
Side Trips
Find places to stay May 23 — 25:

Kilkenny — 2 nights

Marble City

The country's smallest city in terms of population, Kilkenny boasts a rich cultural heritage and diverse tourist attractions that include well-preserved medieval architecture, exciting nightlife, a vibrant culinary scene, and abundant shopping opportunities.
On the 26th (Thu), step into the grandiose world of Kilkenny Castle, contemplate in the serene atmosphere at St. Canice's Cathedral & Round Tower, then contemplate the long history of Jerpoint Park, then contemplate in the serene atmosphere at Jerpoint Abbey, and finally pause for some photo ops at Kells Priory. Get ready for a full day of sightseeing on the 27th (Fri): get a dose of the wild on Hawkeye School of Falconry, then head outdoors with Go With The Flow - River Adventures, and then stroll through Rothe House and Garden.

To see traveler tips, maps, other places to visit, and more tourist information, read our Kilkenny tour planning site.

Traveling by car from Cork to Kilkenny takes 2 hours. Alternatively, you can drive; or do a combination of taxi and train; or take a bus. In May, plan for daily highs up to 58°F, and evening lows to 49°F. Finish up your sightseeing early on the 27th (Fri) so you can catch the flight back home.
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Historic Sites · Tours · Outdoors · Adventure
Side Trip
Find places to stay May 25 — 27:

County Dublin travel guide

4.3
Specialty Museums · Nightlife · History Museums
With the capital city at its heart, County Dublin represents the most visited county in Ireland. Most visitors come to visit the city, exploring the pubs of Temple Bar neighborhood and soaking up Irish culture one pint of Guinness at a time. Beyond its urban core, the county offers cozy seaside villages where visitors can devour freshly caught fish and hear Irish spoken as a first language. Seek out one of the few Gaeltacht, or Irish-language communities, remaining in the county here.
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County Donegal travel guide

4.5
Castles · Lookouts · Nightlife
O'Donnell's County
Encompassing nearly a fifth of the country's coastline, County Donegal remains one of Ireland's wildest regions. Despite its large size, the county houses just over 150,000 residents spread across a landscape of low mountains and natural sea loughs. A bastion of Gaelic culture, the region maintains a distinct cultural identity and a fierce spirit of independence, exemplified by the popular saying "Up here it's different." A place of extremes, County Donegal features a rugged interior and an even rockier coastline, boasting some of the highest sea cliffs in Europe. Still relatively undiscovered by foreign travelers, this region offers you a chance to discover a quieter side of Ireland largely untouched by commercialization and mass tourism.
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County Galway travel guide

4.4
Landmarks · Nightlife · Gardens
County Galway sits in the middle of the country on the western coast. With its lively eponymous city, small traditional Irish villages, and stunning countryside, it offers a varied landscape and culture. Galway City exudes energy as a university town, with pubs on every corner and events and festivals happening year-round. The county has successfully kept the Irish language alive with about 30,000-40,000 Irish speakers, of whom nearly 24,000 are native Irish speakers. Venture outside of the main city to the Aran Islands to discover an Ireland lost in time.
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County Cork travel guide

4.4
Castles · Nightlife · Specialty Museums
Rebel County
County Cork has made a name for itself as the home of the Blarney Stone, the legendary limestone rock rumored to give those who kiss it "the gift of the gab." People come from around the world to bend over backwards and put their lips to the rock in the hopes of becoming more eloquent. In Cork, the county's eponymous city, it is said that the accents rise and fall with the city's rolling terrain. The southern county attracts those looking for the iconic green hills, craggy coastline, and warm hospitality of Ireland. Known affectionately as The Rebel County for its role in the Irish War of Independence, this region is proudly Irish, as evidenced in the region's many cultural festivals and events.
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County Kilkenny travel guide

4.3
Castles · Sacred & Religious Sites · Nightlife
Marble County
Named for the major city within its bounds, County Kilkenny covers a landlocked region in southeast Ireland within the province of Leinster. The historical sites of medieval Kilkenny city, which are more than 400 years old, make it a popular destination. Outside the eponymous city, many cozy Irish towns dot the landscape, with a good number positioned along the banks of the River Nore. The county's countryside is marked with winding rivers, gentle hills, and vast wooded areas.
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